Tag: water

Nav Jivan – During Monsoon

Since three years rainfall in this area had been quite low and had affected agriculture by a huge margin. By the grace of God, this time the rainfall seems to be promising. Until now the amount of rainfall is quite good and hope it continues for some more days. We wish this year farmers will have a good and substantial cultivation of the monsoon crops. Ponds and other water sources that were dried up since two years are starting to flow again. It seems like the greenery has been restored and we pray it continues too. We thank God for this showers of blessings as we hope there would be enough in store for poor farmers.

Here are some photographs of our campus during monsoon this year. hope you enjoy…
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Water from different places getting merged and flowing down to the pond
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Hospital Pond, This pond was dried up completely last year.
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Maintenance guys clearing up the water ways.
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Mr. Eliyas making sure of uninterrupted water flow

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My friends coming to see our pond which is getting filled up
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View of our pond from the other side

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You can see water in the agriculture field outside of our campus…Last year we played soccer in the same fields during this month.

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Rachel bunking office and enjoying the rain out there..

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And the Photographer…

Pray for us so that we may continue to have good rain…

Thank you

God Bless…

Seven Billion Dreams. One Planet. Consume with Care.

Today is World Environment Day and this year’s theme is “Seven Billion Dreams. One Planet. Consume with Care.” wow… what a beautiful theme!! Are you observing? It is not necessary that you observe it grand…just a simple decision to minimise the usage of natural resources in daily life is enough…have you taken any decision? Have you told anyone about this? If you are organising a big programme for the day, it is awesome, if not, a small step is also great.

Oh we humans!!! How long can we be careless?? Oh we Indians!! How much water, electricity and fuel will we waste?  How many forests will we turn into plain lands? How much natural resources will we exploit in the name of development? When will we stop this for the sake of ourselves? Do we want more lives on earth or we are going to be the last??? It’s up to us…

So let’s decide! Be a good steward….Use with care…minimise usage…maximise living…

English http://www.unep.org/wed/

Thank you

God bless…

Adaptation vs. Migration….Let’s hope for the best…

There has been constant decrease in rainfall since three years in our project area. Previous year the rainfall was significantly less, which affected the agriculture up to a great degree. Lots of water sources dried up by the month of October and there was very less water available for winter crop. This caused high number of migrations and if this continues many more will commit the same in near future.

Now the area looks dry and most of the water sources have dried up. There are few wells and tube wells which are active but most of them are drying up. In few days the situation might get worse. There is no water available for agriculture and in few months there would be drinking water crisis for both human beings and animals.

The community is not prepared for this. If they face a severe drought, they will have nothing to do but to depend on government and some NGOs or finally migrate for food and water. That will be horrible…

At this juncture, we are trying to help the community to prepare drought mitigation plans at the village level. In communities we have started the Participatory Assessment of Disaster Risk exercises and presently, we are facilitating vulnerability and capacity assessment. This would help the villagers to have a plan for the anticipated drought by next month.

People are participating actively in this activity, which has been a great experience for me. We don’t know how much impact we would be able to bring in this matter. But we hope the community would be able to make an action plan and execute it. We could have done it a year before but could not do for some reasons. Now our prayer is that the community may adapt best to this situation and improve their resilience.

We would be continuing this activity intensively and I will share my experience in a regular basis…..

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There used to be a small water stream through this channel before two months and now it has completely dried up.
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This view is from the other side of the same stream
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This is the first time in my three years, I saw this pond being dried up…
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This is the view of a village community…you can see the dryness….

To be continued….

Thank you

Water- the Elixir of Life or May be Not…

This was my first visit to Chukru, a small village in the Palamu district. Although I had heard quite a bit about the village, it did not prepare me for what I saw and heard. Here is an account of my experience of my field visit, a very familiar but tragic tale.

Chukru is notoriously well known as the village, with record number of people affected with Skeletal Fluorosis, a condition caused by extensive exposure to Fluorine content in the water. A limited exposure would lead to the dental condition, Fluorosis but a chronic exposure could scar you for life. But Chukru is not only famous for this issue but also the extensive amount of work done on paper and feeble attempts in reality both by government and non- government agencies.

It is said that almost every NGO who initiated work in the Palamu district (one of the most backward districts in the state) had visited the village, made promises only to never come back. The people of the village, frustrated have lost hope and are afraid to trust any more.

I had visited the village because our staff shared that they were finding it difficult to reach out to people (we work with people with disabilities and their rights) as they didn’t want to even access their rights which were available.

Here are lives of two families I met, which is a representation of almost every family in the village.

Upendar is 9 years old, a happy go lucky kid just catching few minutes of play before school started. As I stopped to chat with him, I found that both he and his brother Ajay have been victims to this dreadful condition. Although other discussions held in the village showed that most people who were affected, manifested symptoms only after their twenties.

As we talked, his mother walked in nonchalantly (not a usual sight in the village, especially when there are strangers in your house). She didn’t seem expectant at all, giving me the feeling that she was used to people interviewing their family. Still determined, I sat to talk to her as well. She shared of her three children, both the boys were the ones affected.

The family had also spent a lot of money in treatment and finally gave up as they did not get any medical help.I told her that I had met her son and that he was a bright kid. She beamed as she proudly declared that she was determined to give both her sons good education, as it was the only source of hope.

The other family I met were a couple both very old and had lived with this condition for almost 30 years. In addition to this, they also do not have any children and are dependent on each other. Both of them shared they had adjusted to this life and have no expectations of any change.

A crowd had gathered around us and people were enquiring was this the meeting that was supposed to happen. I was surprised as we did not plan any meeting, when we found out that another “NGO” had come to hold a meeting to discuss the issue. People shared that this was a non-stop happening as the village has been a constant attraction. They asked me what would I do, I didn’t have an answer.

We explained that we are not here to solve their water crisis rather to work with people who are already affected. We enquired if the people had taken any steps, they shared that they had protests, marches but each time same promises were made to shut them up. I have no clue what we will be able to do in this village as everyday people are still drinking the same infected water and just waiting for the worst to happen, a destiny they feel that cannot be changed.

We, in the project don’t want to be just another NGO with promises, the magnitude of the problem scares me but am reassured by this very familiar verse “My Grace is sufficient for you, My strength is made perfect in your weakness”. I am not sure of the way forward but one thing I know is that for any sustainable change to happen, it is absolutely necessary for people to be part of that process. I believe that there is light at the end of this tunnel in Chukru; it’s just a matter of time till we reach there.

If you are reading this, I would appreciate any thoughts, feedbacks and experiences you might have on similar issues.

Thank you

God Bless.Photo5972

Robber’s cave – Dehradun

In October I visited this place. This is just outside of Dehradun city of Uttarakhand. Its a very beautiful place with a water stream flowing through the hollow of a big mountain.

These are the some of the photographs of the place…. have a look….
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way to the cave

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Entrance of the cave

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Restaurant in the stream – Here you can have some snacks after your long trip

Thank You

God Bless…..